BMW at the Tokyo Motor Show 2007. BMW M3 Sedan.

BMW

The world premiere of the BMW M3 Sedan in Tokyo follows only a few weeks after the sales launch of the sporty and elegant BMW M3 Coupe. While there hasn’t been a BMW M3 Sedan since the E36 generation, Carsten Pries explains that doesn’t mean BMW had forgotten how to build a blisteringly fast sedan. The new M3 Sedan takes everything good about the M3 Coupe and adds two doors to the mix (allowing you to better justify the purchase with your significant other). A lot of components specially developed for the M3 Coupe have been used in the M3 Sedan too: the front end is strongly inspired by the M3 Coupe, with wide fenders, a dramatic front clip, bulging hood and vented quarter panels. Out back, a small lip spoiler sits atop the trunk, while M-specific quad pipes let BMW M cognoscenti know that they’re behind something special. As a top athlete in the four-door sedan segment and an individualist amongst high-performance sports cars, the vehicle has already captured a unique position. Thanks to the racing genes of a track-tested chassis as well as the newly developed 4.0-liter V8 high-revving power unit delivering 420 bhp, the lightweight (1680kg) sedan is capable of achieving a most impressive driving performance of 0-100 km/h in 4.9 seconds. With the M3 Sedan lined up in a Motorsport-Paddock with its M siblings M3 Coupe, M5 Sedan and Z4 M Roadster as well as the BMW Sauber F1 race car, Carsten Pries explains the substantiation behind the message “How much Formula 1 is in your BMW?”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.